anuvia:

thatonenarga:

Aang deals with cultural appropriation - (x)

People need to stop reblogging this without the rest of the comic :^)

Part 1: Aang has a negative reaction to people who mistakenly hurt his feelings but had good intentions.

Part 2: Aang calms down and acknowledges that those people’s intentions were good and instead of being upset offers to educate and inform those people and SHARES his culture.

Good message there.

(Source: faineemae, via koopardon)

sugartits23:

evra-tf2:

vespayik:

omg

This thing became perfect at the end

(via hatoholic)

lesbianaunt:

millika:

Who’s Alex?
Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

kick ass

lesbianaunt:

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

kick ass

(via uniomena)

tehnakki:

mindblowingscience:

Next Generation Spacesuit like Second Skin

Scientists from MIT have designed a next-generation spacesuit that acts practically as a second skin, and could revolutionize the way future astronauts travel into space. (Photo : Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)
Astronauts are used to climbing into conventional bulky, gas-pressurized spacesuits, but this new design could allow them to travel in style. Soon they may don a lightweight, skintight and stretchy garment lined with tiny, muscle-like coils. Essentially the new suit acts like a giant piece of shrink-wrap, in which the coils contract and tighten when plugged into a power supply, thereby creating a “second skin.”
"With conventional spacesuits, you’re essentially in a balloon of gas that’s providing you with the necessary one-third of an atmosphere [of pressure,] to keep you alive in the vacuum of space," lead researcher Dava Newman, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems at MIT, said in astatement.
"We want to achieve that same pressurization, but through mechanical counterpressure - applying the pressure directly to the skin, thus avoiding the gas pressure altogether. We combine passive elastics with active materials. … Ultimately, the big advantage is mobility, and a very lightweight suit for planetary exploration."
Newman, who has worked for the past decade on a design for the next-generation spacesuit, describes the new garment in detail in the journal IEEE/ASME: Transactions on Mechatronics.
The MIT BioSuit’s coils, which are a main feature of the outfit, are made from a shape-memory alloy (SMA). At a certain temperature, the material can “remember” and spring back to its engineered shape after being bent or misshapen.
Skintight suits are not a novel idea, but in the past scientists have always struggled with the question: how do you get in and out of a suit that is so tight? That’s where the SMAs come in, allowing the suit to contract only when heated, and subsequently stretched back to a looser shape when cooled.
Though the lightweight suit may not seem at first like it can withstand the harsh environment that is outer space, Newman and his colleagues are sure that the BioSuit would not only give astronauts much more freedom during planetary exploration, but it would also fully support these space explorers.
Newman and his team are not only working on how to keep the suit tight for long periods of time, but also believe their design could be applied to other attires, such as athletic wear or military uniforms.
"An integrated suit is exciting to think about to enhance human performance," Newman added. "We’re trying to keep our astronauts alive, safe, and mobile, but these designs are not just for use in space."


Scuse you, Dava Newman is a FEMALE professor at MIT. 

(fyi, I passed out in a vacuum chamber wearing an earlier version of this suit. =D)

tehnakki:

mindblowingscience:

Next Generation Spacesuit like Second Skin

Scientists from MIT have designed a next-generation spacesuit that acts practically as a second skin, and could revolutionize the way future astronauts travel into space. (Photo : Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)

Astronauts are used to climbing into conventional bulky, gas-pressurized spacesuits, but this new design could allow them to travel in style. Soon they may don a lightweight, skintight and stretchy garment lined with tiny, muscle-like coils. Essentially the new suit acts like a giant piece of shrink-wrap, in which the coils contract and tighten when plugged into a power supply, thereby creating a “second skin.”

"With conventional spacesuits, you’re essentially in a balloon of gas that’s providing you with the necessary one-third of an atmosphere [of pressure,] to keep you alive in the vacuum of space," lead researcher Dava Newman, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and engineering systems at MIT, said in astatement.

"We want to achieve that same pressurization, but through mechanical counterpressure - applying the pressure directly to the skin, thus avoiding the gas pressure altogether. We combine passive elastics with active materials. … Ultimately, the big advantage is mobility, and a very lightweight suit for planetary exploration."

Newman, who has worked for the past decade on a design for the next-generation spacesuit, describes the new garment in detail in the journal IEEE/ASME: Transactions on Mechatronics.

The MIT BioSuit’s coils, which are a main feature of the outfit, are made from a shape-memory alloy (SMA). At a certain temperature, the material can “remember” and spring back to its engineered shape after being bent or misshapen.

Skintight suits are not a novel idea, but in the past scientists have always struggled with the question: how do you get in and out of a suit that is so tight? That’s where the SMAs come in, allowing the suit to contract only when heated, and subsequently stretched back to a looser shape when cooled.

Though the lightweight suit may not seem at first like it can withstand the harsh environment that is outer space, Newman and his colleagues are sure that the BioSuit would not only give astronauts much more freedom during planetary exploration, but it would also fully support these space explorers.

Newman and his team are not only working on how to keep the suit tight for long periods of time, but also believe their design could be applied to other attires, such as athletic wear or military uniforms.

"An integrated suit is exciting to think about to enhance human performance," Newman added. "We’re trying to keep our astronauts alive, safe, and mobile, but these designs are not just for use in space."

Scuse you, Dava Newman is a FEMALE professor at MIT. 

(fyi, I passed out in a vacuum chamber wearing an earlier version of this suit. =D)

(via phantomrose96)

(Source: gunsounds, via uniomena)

pensacosi:

How to make comics

My first vine

(Source: vine.co, via phantomrose96)

kadrey:

Ink wash Xenomorphs

kadrey:

Ink wash Xenomorphs

(via lilaira)

aryabadbitchstark:

Thranduil all up in yo face. What a babe.

(via lilaira)

thefrogman:

Reversed GIFs [imgur]

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via lilaira)

spookumber:

when ur friend posts a selfie

image

(via thespookyfrenchgal)

cumsock:

put this sticker on my ass

cumsock:

put this sticker on my ass

(via lilaira)

ginathethundergoddess:

glasmond:

weloveshortvideos:

Run for your lives!

I can’t believe it

THIS IS MY OTHER FAVOIRTE VINE

(via thespookyfrenchgal)

cotille:

SPACE FUCKS ME UP

(Source: firstgingerdoctor, via koopardon)

The Quick-Fix Is close to being done

fuckyeahtf2:

So I cosplay Medic, and asked my Dad to build the Quick-fix. 

The backpack is done.

The gun will most likely be done by the end of this month, but here are some pictures of what is done.

It is getting close to being finished, only a few more things to do. I cosplay Medic, and will be wearing it when it is done. This is being build by my Dad and @thatguywiththespookysideburns. 

SO EXCITED!!!